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Tag: change management

Reducing the Cost of Change

Two of the authors of the Agile Manifesto, Jim Highsmith and Alistair Cockburn, have said here that the strategy behind Agile methods “is to reduce the cost of change.” To me this is a provocative phrase, “reduce the cost of

How To Deliver Good and Bad News To Your Manager

Does your heart race thinking about delivering important news to your manager? Sometimes we strike the right balance of tone, timing, preparation, and approach and we get rewarded with a positive outcome. And then we’ve all had a few experiences

Making connections

The other morning, I rather crankily tweeted, “I’m trying to write about barriers to adoption, thinking about technology + new business practices. Not that pleasant of a way to start day.” A day or two later, someone tweeted back, “I

Making Change Happen: Smart Team Building

Leaders are told that bringing people together as a “team” is the ultimate means to achieve peak performance. So we feverishly plan team events, team brainstorming, team retreats, team training, team potlucks, team sweatshirts, and every other team-building thing we

How Meetings Steal Your Productivity (and 6 Ways to Get it Back)

Are you sometimes amazed at how little of substance you accomplish in a day? Yes, you went to six meetings today and checked them off your to-do list, but it’s a net loss in productivity because each meeting just generated more

How to Embrace Innovation

Innovation is about making changes — doing things differently, thinking differently. What’s helpful to know is the changes you make don’t have to be huge and dramatic. Incremental changes like putting one foot into the gym to launch a long-term

Taking the Creep out of Scope Creep

You’re faced with a choice: If you pick Door Number 1, you have to add 1 new feature to the service you are creating. If you pick Door Number 2, you have to add 2 new features to the service you are creating. And if you pick

See (how) the project runs

When I first started working at CDL, I was not used to the academic organizational culture. I was coming from a very different environment, that of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, which has a quasi-governmental, quasi-corporate culture. One of